Where are you in the Lifecycle?

 
 
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I'M frustrated

But not ready to give up
Burnout in the work of suicide prevention happens to the best of us. Many of us who stay involved over the long haul do what we do because we are compassionate, giving people. Sometimes, we are not always as good at self-care as we are at taking care of others. Others of us stay involved because we see the fruits of our persistence, and then the winds of change blow in the other direction, and the setbacks are crushing. We need you, so if you are up to it, here are some steps to take to renew the warrior. (If you are not up to it, that’s okay too. See next step in the Life Cycle: Retiring)

 
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I'm New

What do I need to know?
Many people who are recently bereaved by suicide or recently recovering from another suicidal experience in their lives, often find themselves in a place where they feel compelled to help others in some way, to make meaning out of their despair. If you are new to this area of suicide prevention and are someone who has recently lost a loved one or who has lived through your own suicide crisis, we are so glad you are here. When we find ourselves in these major transitions, it’s a good practice to slow things down a bit, and discern: am I ready for this?

 
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I'm Ready

Help Get Me Started
Great! Roll up your sleeves. There is a lot of work to be done. Everyone can play a role. First, let’s do a little self-assessment on your talents, passions, and circle of influence. Where does your gladness meet the world’s sadness? Take out a piece of paper and draw a line down the middle. On one side list “What are my talents, skills, assets, and passions?” and on the other side list “What is most upsetting to me about suicide?” By linking up the two lists, you may have a better idea on how you are best suited to serve.